ScandiKitchen Christmas: Apple trifle

This is a pimped-up version of a very traditional Norwegian and Danish dessert known as either tilslørte bondepiker or æblekage – layers of crispy breadcrumbs, apple compote and thick cream – utterly delicious, but more of an everyday dessert. Here, I’ve added a cake layer to make it more like a trifle, but have kept the crunch by adding some hazelnuts and oats.

ScandiKitchen Christmas: Apple trifle

ScandiKitchen Christmas: Apple trifle This is a pimped-up version of a very traditional Norwegian and Danish dessert known as either tilslørte bondepiker or æblekage – layers of crispy breadcrumbs, apple compote and thick cream – utterly delicious, but more of an everyday dessert. Here, I’ve added a cake layer to make it more like a trifle, but have kept the crunch by adding some hazelnuts and oats. Print This
Serves: 6-8
Nutrition facts: calories fat
Rating: 5.0/5
( 1 voted )

Ingredients

  • For the apple compote
  • 1kg tart apples (Bramleys or
  • Granny Smiths)
  • 1 vanilla pod, seeds
  • scraped out
  • 3 tbsp sugar
  • For the cake layer
  • 125g plain flour
  • 1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • A pinch of salt
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp mixed spice
  • 75g softened butter
  • 100g caster sugar
  • 1 egg
  • For the hazelnut-oat crunch
  • 50g butter
  • 40g golden caster sugar
  • 25g rolled oats
  • 50g panko breadcrumbs
  • 50g chopped hazelnuts
  • To assemble
  • 150ml good-quality cold custard
  • 200ml whipped cream

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 180°C. Grease and line three 18cm diameter round cake tins.
  • Melt the butter in a saucepan, then add the milk and saffron and set aside to infuse.
  • Whisk the eggs and sugar together until thick and fluffy. Mix the dry ingredients together, then sift into the sugar mixture and fold.
  • Add the yogurt and the saffron milk to the mixture and fold again until incorporated.
  • Pour the batter into the prepared pans, dividing it evenly, and bake in the preheated oven for around 12–14 min or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Saffron is quite drying, so take care not to over-bake. Every oven varies, so keep an eye on the cakes. Leave the layers to cool in the pans while you make the buttercream.
  • Add a few tablespoons of boiling water to the marzipan and mix it with a fork to melt it slightly (this avoids lumps of marzipan in the buttercream). Using an electric beater, in a bowl mix the sugar and butter on high speed and add the marzipan. You may need to add a bit of milk, too. Beat and allow to fluff up for several minutes on high speed. If you feel it is too sweet, you can add a few drops of lemon juice or similar.
  • Remove the cakes from the pans and peel off the paper. Place the first layer of cake on the serving plate, then add a layer of the buttercream.
  • Repeat until you have used all three layers. You can leave the cake naked and just decorate the top with the remaining buttercream or you can use the buttercream to give a light coating all around the sides, as shown here, for a very frosty-looking cake. I like to decorate it with frosted redcurrants for that festive snowy look.

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